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Anne Applebaum Dialogue | Munk Debates

SEASON TWO - EPISODE #6

Anne Applebaum Dialogue

Anne Applebaum, Pulitzer-prize winning historian, bestselling author and past Munk Debater, joins us to discuss the future of democracy in an era of populist politics and rising authoritarianism.

Guests
Anne Applebaum

About this episode

Anne Applebaum joins host Rudyard Griffiths to discuss her provocative ideas about the future of democracy. Can our democratic values and institutions survive in an era of populist politics, polarizing social media and rising global authoritarianism? To find out listen now.

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Anne Applebaum

“Liberal democracies always demanded things from citizens: participation, argument, effort, struggle. They always required some tolerance for cacophony and chaos, as well as some willingness to push back at the people who create cacophony and chaos.”

Anne Applebaum

“Liberal democracies always demanded things from citizens: participation, argument, effort, struggle. They always required some tolerance for cacophony and chaos, as well as some willingness to push back at the people who create cacophony and chaos.”

Anne Applebaum is a Pulitzer-prize winning historian, a staff writer for The Atlantic, an international university lecturer.  

Born in Washington, D.C., Applebaum earned her undergraduate degree at Yale University and was a Marshall Scholar at the London School of Economics and St. Anthony’s College, Oxford. Currently, she is a senior fellow of international affairs and Agora fellow in residence at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, where she co-directs a program on 21st century propaganda. 

Earlier, Applebaum was a Washington Post columnist for 15 years, a member of the paper’s editorial board, and worked as the foreign and deputy editor of the Spectator magazine in London. She covered the collapse of communism as the Warsaw correspondent of the Economist magazine and the Independent newspaper. 

Applebaum’s book Red Famine: Stalin’s War on Ukraine received the Lionel Gelber Prize in 2018 and Gulag: A History won the Pulitzer Prize for non-fiction in 2004. Both books, along with Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944-1956, have been translated into more than 24 languages. Her most recent book, published in 2020, is Twilight of Democracy: The Seductive Lure of Authoritarianism.  

Applebaum is married to Radoslaw Sikorski, is a Polish politician and writer, with whom she has two children.

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