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Ian Morris Dialogue | Munk Debates

SEASON TWO - EPISODE #5

Ian Morris Dialogue

Ian Morris, archaeologist, historian, bestselling author and big thinker, joins us to discuss the past and future of human civilization in an era of rapid social and technological change.

Guests
Ian Morris

About this episode

Ian Morris joins host Rudyard Griffiths for a far-ranging discussion on what the last fifteen thousand years of human history foretell for the future of human civilization, and why the next forty years might be the most consequential in history.

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Guests

Ian Morris

"The next 40 years will be the most important in human history."

Ian Morris

"The next 40 years will be the most important in human history."

Ian Morris teaches at Stanford University, where he has won the Dean’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, and is also a Senior Fellow at the London School of Economics’ IDEAS institute. He is a historian and archaeologist, and has excavated in Britain, Greece, and Sicily. He studies long-term global history, asking how the patterns of the past might reveal the future. He has published fourteen books, including the prize-winning Why the West Rules—For Now, published in Canada by McClelland and Stewart. His latest book is tentatively titled Fog in the Channel: Britain, Europe and the Wider World Since 6000 BC. His writings have appeared in The Globe and Mail, the New Yorker, the New York Times, and the London Sunday Times. He has spoken at the World Economic Forum in Davos, delivered the Tanner Lectures in Human Values at Princeton University, and has served as the Australian Army’s Keogh Professor of Future Land Warfare and on the Scientific Advisory Board of the Max Planck Institute. His research has been funded by the Carnegie and Guggenheim Foundations, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the National Geographic Society, and he is a Fellow of the British Academy and the Royal Society for the Arts. He is currently writing a book called In the Beginning: A New History of the Ancient World, to be published by Princeton University Press.

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