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Samantha Power | Munk Debates

EPISODE #24

Samantha Power

Former US Ambassador to the UN Samantha Power joins us for a conversation on the future of international institutions after COVID-19.

Guests
Samantha Power

About this episode

The question we are all starting to ask ourselves is what will the world look like post-COVID-19? How will this global pandemic change everything from our politics to our culture to global affairs? Former US Ambassador to the UN Samantha Power joins us for an insightful conversation about how the role of global institutions, like the UN and the World Health Organization, might change after the coronavirus pandemic.

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Guests

Samantha Power

"We're going to have a really hard time resembling a full recovery, even on the economic front, if we aren't looking out for developing countries around the world."

Samantha Power

"We're going to have a really hard time resembling a full recovery, even on the economic front, if we aren't looking out for developing countries around the world."

Ambassador Samantha Power is the Anna Lindh Professor of the Practice of Global Leadership and Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School and the William D. Zabel ’61 Professor of Practice in Human Rights at Harvard Law School.

From 2013 to 2017 Power served as the 28th U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations, as well as a member of President Obama’s cabinet. In this role, Power became the public face of U.S. opposition to Russian aggression in Ukraine and Syria, negotiated the toughest sanctions in a generation against North Korea, and supported President Obama’s pathbreaking actions to end the Ebola crisis. President Obama has called her “one of our foremost thinkers on foreign policy,” saying that “she showed us that the international community has a moral responsibility and a profound interest in resolving conflicts and defending human dignity.”

From 2009 to 2013, Power served on the National Security Council as Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Multilateral Affairs and Human Rights.

Forbes called her “a powerful crusader for U.S foreign policy as well as human rights and democracy” when it named her one of the “World’s 100 Most Powerful Women.” She has been named as one of Foreign Policy’s “Top 100 Global Thinkers” and has twice been selected as one of TIME’s “100 Most Influential People.”

Her book “A Problem from Hell”: America and the Age of Genocide won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award in 2003. Her most recent book, The Education of an Idealist: A Memoir (2019), was a New York TimesWall Street Journal, and USA Today bestseller.

Power began her career as a journalist, reporting from places such as Bosnia, East Timor, Kosovo, Rwanda, Sudan, and Zimbabwe. Before joining the U.S. government, Power was the founding executive director of the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at the Kennedy School, a columnist for TIME, and a National Magazine Award-winning contributor to the Atlantic, the New Yorker, and the New York Review of Books.

Show Notes

You can order a copy of Samantha Power’s book, The Education of an Idealist, here.
 
Samantha wrote an op-ed in the New York Times about why America must take the lead in combatting the virus.
 
Here is a look at how the World Health Organization is funded, by country and corporations
 
This is a breakdown of how the UN is funded, by country.
 
Samantha recommends reading Switch: How to Change Things When Change Is Hard, by the Heath Brothers. You can read more about the book here.